A New Hope

In preparation for the release of Episode 7: The Force Awakens on the 17th I thought it was about time to look back at my favourite movie franchise of all time. Like many other people born in the 80’s I grew up watching the original trilogy and have memorised nearly every second of these timeless classics. I would not have been the only one that got excited with the release of the prequel trilogy only to be momently disappointed by the result but hopefully this time will be different. This has raised a serious question for me regarding viewing order ever since and thanks to a few hints online I have settled on IV – V – (I)II- III – VI with the prequels acting as a flashback after the plot twist of “Empire Strikes Back”. My purpose in giving this little preamble is to offer a suggestion to fallow fans trying to introduce Star Wars to others as Episode IV is a much better hook then the prequels while also being much more satisfying for die hards. Considering this I have chosen to review the saga in this order and hopefully if you have any doubts by the end you might give it a try.

Episode IV: A New Hope – 1977

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I can only imagine how the opening of “A New Hope” first memorised audiences in 1977 from the characteristic scrolling prologue to the opening space battle but it was a masterful piece of film making. The iconic scene with its chasing Star Destroyer filling the screen is often not given enough credit for hooking audiences. The sequence in its entirety is the perfect start to a film introducing a whole new galaxy as it not only gets the blood pumping but it importantly leaves the viewer with a plethora of questions not the least of which is based around the central plot and the plans which are ‘not in the main computer’. In addition, it gives a glimpse of the Star Wars universe from Stormtroopers and Darth Vader to the rebellious Princess Leia. Combined these elements engages an audience and leaves them wanting more over the next 120 minutes which is a lesson for any filmmaker.

The film largely follows a linear storyline from this point forward with only a few brief exchanges between Darth Vader, Grand Moff Tarkin and Princess Leia on the Death Star interrupting the main plot. Besides these moments the plot maintains a fairly classical formula with a young hero found in the middle of nowhere on the planet of Tatooine adopted by a wise mentor and drawn into a galactic conflict by forces outside their control, the arrival of R2-D2 and C-3PO. The journey to answer the Princess’s distress call leads them to the egotistical Han Solo and his co-pilot before escaping the clutches of the Empire. There escape is short lived as they run into the Death Star and must disguise themselves to save the Princess and escape, before returning for the climatic final battle. In many ways’ the main storyline is actually reminiscent of mythology as the characters are on a quest to deliver the droids but are forced to face several challenges to prove themselves before a heroic victory.

The characters are only a slight deviation from this as Luke is perfectly characterised by Mark Hamill who optimises the naïve young upstart dreaming of adventure. Harrison Ford’s casting as Han Solo was truly inspired as he represents the character’s conflict between his instinct for self-preservation and noble delusions of grandeur. It’s no wonder why he has become an in during fan favourite ever since with his ability to delivery witty insults and appear aloof from those around him while still remaining irresistible charming.  The difference is in Princess Leia who refuses to be the traditional damsel in distress as Carrie Fisher gives her a sharp edge fitting for someone who believes in a higher cause. Not only is her passion obvious when confronted by Darth Vader and the threat to her home planet of Alderaan but later in her dealings with Han and Luke during their rescue attempt. Beyond this key trio R2-D2 and Chewbacca are something of an oddity as it is impossible to think of another movie where the audience cannot understand two of the principal characters by design, this places a lot of importance on the actors’ delivery and their interaction with each other. In the case of R2 his constant companion C-3PO while doing some translations for Luke, normally carries on the second half of a conversation allowing the audience to infer what has been said in the odd collection of beeps. The overall success of this is a combination of good script writing and excellent delivery by Anthony Daniels with the right insinuation in his tone. This talented cast and their on screen chemistry is a large part of the franchises success and is unfortunately something missing from the prequel trilogy.

The importance of relatable characters and a reasonably straightforward plot cannot be overestimated in a movie like “A New Hope” which is intruding audiences to a whole mythology. These elements have allowed people since 1977 to focus on understanding the back story including the nature of the Force and the way of the Jedi. Most of this information is given to the audience through the instructions of Obi Wan Kenobi as he begins Luke’s training. Alec Guinness is perfect for this role as he brings a real gravitas and is also able to communicate a sense of the burden he carries due to the character’s past failures. One thing that Star Wars does well is that although it needs to communicate a lot of information to the audience it does not bore us with any long explanations as the training is interspersed and involves some development of the plot, for example Obi Wan’s decision to leave for Alderaan. Lesser films often try to explain everything rather than using these little tricks like a remote training exercise to show an audience that a lightsabre can defect blaster fire, this is one area where “A New Hope” really distinguishes itself as most of the context be it the Force or the Rebellion evolves gradually out of the plot.

It may have aged since its release in 1977 but the original film smashed onto the screen with revolutionary special effects, precise film editing, well-crafted sound, fantastic set and costume design. Unlike today it was a combination of body suits, prosthetics and miniatures which gave us the look with a combination of wires and blue screen for visual effects. Meanwhile the sound designers gave use the unmistakable sound of a lightsabre while seamlessly blending in all the little background ticks that make a movie. This is capped off by John William’s masterful score which produced the most recognisable movie theme of all time, one that represents the scale of the film and gives that uplifting sense of triumph needed for the final scene. Possibly the greatest example of their efforts is in the Rebels attack on the Death Star as it started out in a parking lot with a collection of model kits on a couple of table tennis tables filmed from a jeep driving past. This raw footage comes to life with the addition of sound effects and the expert editing to quickly cut between shots of Luke’s  X-Wing, Grand Moff Tarkin, Darth Vader, the rebels on Yavin and the count down clock to add the perfect amount of tension. Finally, Williams score echo’s the movement of the fighters through the trench and is simply the exclamation point making for one hell of a climax.  It is the hard work of all these teams that were ultimately responsible for creating the Star Wars universe by making George Lucas’ vision a reality and it is not surprising that they were recognised by claiming 6 Oscars in 1978.

Writing this review, I have been trying desperately to think of anything that could have been improved and coming up with only minor adjustments. One that stuck in my mind was the characterisation of Grand Moff Tarkin as despite his position ‘holding Vader’s leash’ he is never really developed in any detail. These little things don’t detract from the movie in the least and are more observational then critical as I can’t imagine how Tarkin’s role could be developed without impacting the screen presence of Darth Vader. As such I still consider “A New Hope” to be one of the most complete films I have ever seen. 

9.5/10

Jono

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About jgbarry

A teacher, poet, novelist and causal tech guru I am always keen to share my thoughts. A firm believer in critical thinking I rarely rush a decision without any research and once made my mind is primed for a good debate.

Posted on December 14, 2015, in Movies, Review and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. I agree with you on Grand Moff Tarkin. I’ve always felt that Peter Cushing was downplayed just a little bit. Being the commander of the Death Star, one would think he to be a very important person with a very important role in the Empire with power of rank even over Vader himself, but it’s never really expanded upon. The lines he did have to work with though I feel had some of the best deliveries in the entire film. “Fear will keep the local systems in line, fear of this battle station”.

    In particular the scene prior to the destruction of Alderaan. “I grow tired of asking this so it will be the last time. *Where* is the rebel base?” – the line was delivered with such malice and indifference to the moral and emotional blackmail of the situation while sounding so calm and collected. Truly masterful.

    John Williams’ score was most definitely the glue that brought the entire film together. From the short but inspired ‘Binary Sunset scene’ invoking a whole raft of emotions (frustration, longing, dreaming for something meaningful from life – something we can all relate to) – to the fast-paced intensity of the Battle of Yavin. The music was, I think, both the best movie score ever written in film history – and Williams’ best ever.

    Like

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